Don’t Call It a Comeback: The Old Faith For a New Day, edited by Kevin DeYoung

I liked being able to read this book in bits and chunks over the past few months. Sometimes it helps to chew on things for a bit, and there is a good deal to chew on here. It works well as a resource to take off the shelves every now and then. Kevin DeYoung has a great heart for people and the gospel, and it shows here. His first essay on the secret to reaching the next generation was needed and timely for me. He writes about making sure to grab them with passion, win them with love, hold them with holiness, challenge them with truth, and amaze them with God. It is a good corrective for where much of youth ministry has gone. I also liked Jonathan Leeman’s piece about God. He deals with the Moral Therapeutic Deism that is prevalent. He says, But one thing is certain: every one of us, in our natural state, believes that God is pretty much like us.” He goes on to show how low our view of God can be and what the truth is. He also quotes Brad Pitt to make his point about our view of God, “Movie actor Brad Pitt, explaining why he abandoned Christianity, spoke for many when he said, ‘I didn’t understand this idea of a God who says, ‘You have to acknowledge me. You have to say that I’m the best, and then I’ll give you eternal happiness. If you won’t, then you don’t get it’ It seemed to be about ego. I can’t see God operating from ego, so it made no sense to me.’ Pitt’s operating assumption, as with every fallen human, is that he is “like God.'” Each author provides some resources for further reading after each essay as well. Russell Moore’s essay on the Kingdom, Tim Challies’ essay on Jesus Christ, and Tullian Tchividjian’s essay on worship were my other favorites. Tchividjian quotes G.K. Chesterton to help make his general point about the otherness of worship, “How much larger your life would be if your self could become smaller in it.” May that be our prayer in the presence of a holy God.

I would recommend this book for the reference shelf any believer that wants a quick but not so simple dictionary of the faith.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Don’t Call It a Comeback: The Old Faith For a New Day, edited by Kevin DeYoung

  1. I have been reading your reviews and enjoy some of the same authors. I also noticed you recieved books from netgalley.com and was wondering how hard it was to get involved in their program (I.e. Number of followers.) How is DeYoung’s writing style? I am considering picking up a few of his books such as A Hole in Our Holiness and was curious. I have also recently started a blog to post my thoughts and book reviews for Reformation Trust if you are ever interested in some review of their offerings.

    • I’m not sure that NetGalley really looks at followers. At least for some of the Christian Publishers. You should definitely put your profile up there and start requesting. As for Kevin DeYoung stuff, I like how he is solid in his doctrine, and can relate to younger people. I have read, The Hole in Our Holiness, and I really enjoyed it. I hope to have my review up soon.

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